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Jerky Around the World

world_jerky1

We’ve looked at some ways old-timers and Native Americans have  made jerky without all the conveniences of today.  But various  forms of jerky are also popular around the world.

 

1) The Alaska Eskimos made a version of jerky called Pemmican.  Pemmican consisted of crushed and powdered meat to which fat is mixed in.  Sometimes berries would also be added.  [1]  Pemmican was also popular with the indigenous peoples of North America.  [7]

2) In Canada you will find jerky being made from of the breast of a goose.  This type of jerky can be made either sliced or ground and extruded from a jerky gun.

3) In South Africa you’re likely to find Biltong.[2]    This is a form of jerky typically made from beef, game or ostrich.  The preparation differs from what we think of as jerky in that it is made during cold months to reduce risk of bacteria and the cold air dried the product faster.  Biltong is never smoked and often vinegar is used to cure.

4) Bakkwa is a food found in China that is similar to jerky.[3]   Originally it tended to have a  salty-sweet taste, but today not only has the sweet taste been reduced but also the method of preparation has been modernized.  Traditionally it was made of pork, however, it is now sometimes made of beef or mutton.   It is also popular in Singapore and Malaysia thanks to Chinese immigrants.

5) Carne Seca is a dried meat product found in Mexico.  [4]  It can also be used in the preparation of certain dishes.

6) Dendeng is a dried meat found in Indonesia.  [5]  Much like the Bakkwa it has a salty-sweet flavor but rather than drying it is cured through frying.

7) Sukuti is a dried meat found in Nepal. [6]  It is prepared by hanging chunks of meat over a slow fire or left in the sun.  It is often used in other dishes.

 

After doing the bit of research for this post, got to think that we’re very fortunate to have access to dehydrators with a wide variety of pre-packaged seasonings and cures to make our jerky whether it’s strips or sticks.  To see the top 10 in jerky making equipment and seasonings, visit this link.

 

 

 

[1] http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-to-make-pemmican/#axzz47FlkKmpz

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biltong

[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakkwa

[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carne_seca

[5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendeng

[6] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sukuti

[7] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

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