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Jerky Guns – Comparison

Jerky sticks (round and flat) are one of the most popular jerky treats to make.   As we like to say  . . . they’re ‘easy eaters’ – and you can use just about any ground meat – or leftover meats ground up –  to make them.

 

While they can be made by hand, having a dedicated jerky gun is by far the easiest way to ensure consistency – which of course, means better, more even dehydrating.

 

There are a lot of jerky guns out there ranging in size, quality and cost. So, if you’re not sure which jerky gun to buy consider the following:

 

  • Will you be making just jerky or do you want to use the gun for making sausage . . . now or in the future?
  • Frequency – how often do you plan on making jerky? How much use will the gun get?
  • How sturdy do you want the equipment, i.e., plastic vs. metal?
  • How much ground meat do you want the gun to hold at one time?

 

We’ve taken a look at some of the top jerky guns and given a breakdown below of various features. Note: The information has been taken from the item’s Amazon page, to read more about each item or get a price, click on the image.

 
LEM Products Jerky Cannon

  • Holds 1-1/2 lbs. meat
  • Construction: Anodized aluminum & plastic
  • Comes with flat & round nozzles
  • Comes with cleaning brush

 

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LEM Products Jerky Gun

  • Holds 3/4 lb. meat
  • Construction: Plastic & some metal
  • Comes with flat & round nozzles

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Weston Original Jerky Gun

  • Holds 1-1/2 lbs. meat
  • Construction: Aluminum
  • Comes with 4 nozzles
  • Comes with cleaning brush

 

 

 

 

 

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Eastman Outdoors 38257 Jerky and Sausage Maker Kit

  • Holds less than 1 lb. meat
  • Construction: ‘Heavy duty materials”
  • Comes with 2 jerky nozzles
  • Comes with 3 sausage tubes

 

 

 

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To see what others have to say about each item, visit the item’s Amazon page by clicking on the image.    Still not sure?  Check out the ‘Questions Answered’ for each item.  Chances are your question may have  already been asked.  And if not, you can ask a question and have it answered by previous purchasers.

 

Check back next time when we’re taking a look at vegan-jerky!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-Traditional Jerky Seasoning Flavors

 

If you’re like me, you sometimes find yourself in a rut . . . doing the same things, eating the same foods and making the same jerky flavors. For those ready to try something new, here are a few jerky seasonings that are different from the more traditional flavors.

Slap Ya Mama is a 5-star Cajun seasoning that comes in three flavors:
  • Hot – Hot Cajun blend with NO MSG
  • Original – Cajun blend that can also be used with any type of meat or to spice up burgers.
  • White Pepper – Cajun blend using white pepper for those who don’t like or are allergic to black pepper. Little spicier than the original; not as spicy as the hot.

Click here to purchase these on Amazon

Caribbean Jerk Seasoning

The Caribbean spices in these products offer an exotic flavor from hot to mild:

  • Grace Jerk Seasoning Mild – use as marinade or rub
  • Grace Jerk Seasoning Hot – use as marinade or rub
  • Jerk Top Rankin Rub – use as jerky marinade, BBQ rub or on popcorn (5-star rating)

Click here to purchase these on Amazon

Last but not least here is a product for those who can’t get enough heat.

 

HOT & HOTTER !
  • Ask the Meatman – Hot Teriyaki – 5-stars for flavor and quantity
  • Ass Kickin’ Seasoning from Hell – Habanero  – 4-1/2 stars for this one

 

Click here to purchase any of these on Amazon

 

 

Machaca: Jerky by Another Name

Taking a detour this post from traditional jerky to a ‘south-of-the-border’ jerky called machaca. [1]  This started out with my trying to find some good recipes for making enchiladas and tacos using traditional jerky.  But . . . since I couldn’t find any, changed directions on finding some good recipes using machaca which is made in a similar fashion.  So let’s get started !

 

To make machaca, you will marinade the beef, cook it, shred it and only then will it be dried if desired.   Note:  While machaca was often dried for use ‘on the trail’ in olden days as drying gave it a longer life, it is more often immediately used today to make enchiladas, tacos or quesadillas – with any leftovers frozen to enjoy later.

 

 

A beef that shreds well should be selected, i.e.., skirt steak, brisket, etc.  And, if the cut is large –  say 2-3 lbs. – cut it into portions that are about one pound each. This will allow for better marinating and more even cooking.

The process of cooking machaca is to braise the marinated meat on high heat to sear it, add liquid to meat*, reduce heat to low simmer and cook – then shred.

* The liquid can be oil, tomatoes, vegetables, etc.

 

Basic Marinade for Machaca [1]

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 cup vegetable or olive oil

Note: You can also add in other ingredients to suit your taste, ie, cayenne if you like hot.

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl
  2. Add beef (1 lb. size pieces)  making sure all sides are coated
  3. Cover and refrigerate overnight
  4. To use: Drain thoroughly and let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes before starting cooking process

 

 

 

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Machaca Recipe [1]

 

Ingredients

  • 2-3 marinated beet cut into 1 lb portions
  • 1 yellow onion diced
  • 1/2 green pepper diced
  • 4 cloves garlic (minced or pressed)
  • 1 fresh jalapeno pepper minced (optional & don’t forget remove seeds & wash your hands immediately after mincing)
  • 1 14oz. can tomatoes (diced) – with or without green chilies
  • 1/4 cup beef broth
  • 1 tbsp dried oregano
  • 1 tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp hot sauce (Tabasco, Srirachi)
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • vegetable or olive oil for searing

Preparation

  1. Heat oil -(medium-high heat) in large pot until very hot
  2. Sear beef to rich brown color (number seared together will depend on size of pot)
  3. Remove beef from pot and add onions, peppers and garlic – saute
  4. Add in remaining ingredients along with beef
  5. Bring to a boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to incorporate
  6. Reduce heat, cover and simmer on low for about 2 hours (Meat should be fork tender and fall apart when done)
  7. Remove meat to cutting board and shred with forks
  8. Return to pot and cook/simmer, uncovered to reduce liquid. Meat should be almost dry
  9. Serve or use for enchiladas, tacos or quesadillas.

 

For other recipes, please visit this link  and for another variation of how to make  machaca, check out  this link.

 

[1]  http://www.texascooking.com/features/jan2002beefmachaca.htm